Archive for the ‘News’ Category

5 Gifts to Improve Someone’s New Year – 2010 Gift Guide

December 6, 2010

1. Give the give of health

Gift a Single Recreational Cooking or Baking/Pastry Classes. There is a great starter 4-Week Healthy Cooking Series. For your gift all the service, ingredients and equipment to succeed in today’s restaurant kitchens and master techniques that can be used at home. Classes encompass current cooking trends and recipes so that meals will taste fantastic. This is a great way to learn to Cook and Bake, while making new friends and having fun!

2. Give the gift of confidence

There’s not much you can do about height but here’s a simple gift for under $20.00 that could help your friend step into the new year feeling like a brand new person.

3. Give the gift of wellness

Here are 3 ideas around Health and Wellness that extend on the idea of better eating:

I. Give a gift certificate for a day at the spa

II. Get a friend or family member a gym membership to help change their physical appearance and inner outlook on life

III. help a friend find a more balanced day with a gift certificate to Yoga Works
4. Give the gift of giving.

Kiva’s mission is to connect people, through lending, for the sake of alleviating poverty. Kiva empowers individuals to lend to an entrepreneur across the globe. By combining microfinance with the internet, Kiva is creating a global community of people connected through lending.

5. Give the gift of organization.

File with style! These colorful, patterned Letter-Size Interior File Folders make organizing more fun! Made from premium, heavyweight coated card stock, they feature 1/3 cut tabs

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Life & Style: How Tom Makes Himself Taller

August 20, 2010

From the pages of the August 30, 2010 edition of Life & Style, Tom Cruise is critic-ed on the night of the Knight and Day premier in London for looking as tall as Cameron Diaz. Reportedly, Jimmy Au’s tailor to Stars 5′ 8″ and under has dressed Tom in the past. The magazine also reports that Cruise uses Lift Kits shoe insoles to help boost his height, which can also be found at Jimmy Au’s. Check out pages 44 and 45 to get the full scoop.

How Tom makes himself taller

Tom Cruise – Knight and Day – Short and Tall

August 20, 2010

Tom Cruise and Cameron Diaz at the premiere of Knight and Day in London. Cruise looked to be the height of Cameron Diaz. Tom is reported to be about 5′ 7″ tall and Cameron around 5′ 9″ tall plus she was wearing about 4 inch heels.
The two posed for photos together looking about the same height although Diaz is slouching slightly. Tom Cruise’s boots appear to have a heel on them, but his knees are at about the same height as Diaz’s. He may possibly be wearing shoe lifts. We can only speculate.

reported by the Huffington Post

Shoe lifts raise airport security alarm

April 22, 2010

By CBC News, cbc.ca, Updated: April 20, 2010 6:00 PM

A traveler who stuffed his shoes with batteries and metal plates in a bid to appear taller put security officials on high alert at Toronto’s Pearson International Airport on Tuesday.

Shortly before 10 a.m. ET, a man traveling to Chicago was stopped by security.

It was the unusual contents of his shoes that set off alarm bells — specifically a series of concealed metal plates and batteries.

The man was detained, taken to a nearby police station and questioned for five hours. The incident drew the interest of Peel Regional Police, the RCMP and INSET, Canada’s integrated national security enforcement team.

But instead of concealing bomb-making equipment, the man was simply trying to appear taller, police eventually determined.

“If anything, it was a crime of vanity,” CBC’s John Lancaster reported. “He used a series of batteries and plates to make himself appear taller. Essentially, they were homemade lifts.”

The man was released without charges at 3:30 p.m. ET.

He boarded an afternoon flight to Chicago to connect with a flight to China.

—-

Our question is whether this guy is truly short, doing a dry run for a terrorist organization or just stupid. Well we know he’s stupid; wonder whether he had height on his mind or malicious intent.

China’s Beauty Boom on Oprah.com

March 4, 2010

For most of the Western world, style in the late ’60s and early ’70s was defined by miniskirts, mod dresses and platform heels. But for China, the most populated country on the planet, these were decades devoid of style.

In 1966, China’s Communist Party chairman Mao Zedong launched his Cultural Revolution and banned the pursuit of beauty. For 10 years, every man, woman and child was required to dress in masculine, military-style uniforms. Any display of femininity—like long hair, makeup or jewelry—was strictly forbidden. If a woman broke the rules, she faced severe punishment.

Now, there’s another revolution happening—a billion-dollar beauty boom. Lisa Ling travels 7,000 miles to Shanghai to see how China is redefining its standard of beauty.

Five years ago, Vogue magazine launched a Chinese edition. Angelica Cheung, the editor-in-chief, says it’s been a success since the first issue hit stands. “We were the first Vogue to actually make a profit in the first year,” she says.

Angelica says, in the past 10 years, women in this Communist country have started to enjoy all that the beauty industry has had to offer…and business is booming.

“Go into any store that sells cosmetics or skincare products throughout the country, and it will be packed,” Lisa says. “In fact, next to tourism, automobiles and real estate, beauty is the fourth-biggest industry in the biggest country in the world.”
Over the past decade, Lisa has traveled to China more than a dozen times, and in that time, she’s seen this beauty boom affect women’s lives dramatically. “In the early years, it was so obvious when you would see someone from the mainland because she just didn’t really have any style,” Lisa says. “It wasn’t important.”

Lisa says she used to draw crowds if she wore lipstick in China…but not anymore. “Now, when you go to China, it is so incredibly modern, and you’ll see some of the most stylish women you would see anywhere,” she says. “It’s changed remarkably in a very short period of time.”

The world will have to wait and see if this cultural shift is for better or for worse. “I think what’s happening in China is symbolic of what has happened all over the world,” Lisa says. “Is it a good thing when women are completely obsessed with enhancing their look and becoming more beautiful? It’s a hard one to say because we all sort of are. … But is it a little sad? It is, because it has changed so quickly. It’s, I think, always unfortunate to see large groups of people becoming sort of slaves to the whole machine, if you will.”
Ten years ago, cosmetic surgery was also banned in China, but today, it’s a multibillion-dollar industry.

Lisa took cameras inside Shanghai’s Ninth People’s Hospital, one of the largest in the nation, to meet men and women waiting to get nipped and tucked. In the plastic surgery waiting area, she meets a college student and a woman in her 60s. Both women are there for the same procedure—eyelid reshaping surgery.

“They both walked in, met their surgeon for the first time and, in just two hours, were on operating tables,” Lisa says.

Every year, thousands of people request this popular procedure, which reshapes the smaller Asian eyelid into a larger, more Western shape. Dr. Sun Baoshan, a Chinese plastic surgeon, says he’s seen a dramatic increase in patients over the past few years.

“Four years ago, we had only 30,000 surgeries per year here, but last year we had 40,000 cosmetic surgeries at this hospital alone,” Dr. Sun Baoshan says. “This year, it will be 50,000.”
Americans are no strangers to extreme plastic surgery, but while in Shanghai, Lisa learns about a radical new procedure that’s gaining popularity in China—leg lengthening.

In this part of the world, Lisa says height is a sign of status, and oftentimes, it’s a prerequisite for success. “Minimum height requirements are not unusual for many jobs, for admission to some colleges, even to land a date,” Lisa says.

As medical technology improves, more people are going under the knife to have this painful, controversial procedure, which can help patients grow anywhere from a few inches to a full foot.

At the Shanghai Height Increasing Specialized Institute, Lisa meets Dr. Bai Helong, a Chinese doctor who modernized the leg-lengthening procedure. He says his patients want to be taller for many reasons.

“China has 1.3 billion people, so getting a job is quite difficult,” Dr. Bai Helong says. “As a result, a short person not only experiences difficulty in getting a job, but also trouble in their marriage, love life, family, career and many other areas.”

Jessy, a 27-year-old who’s interested in undergoing the procedure, says she’s willing to take a year off work to grow a few inches. Currently, she’s 5’3”.

“I want to be 5’6” or 5’7”. Just being tall makes me feel much confidence,” she says. “I’m always jealous when I see tall girls walking around. I just want to be just like them.”
Dr. Bai’s patients go to great lengths to stand a few inches above their competition. “Pain is definitely a part of the procedure, which is both horrifying and miraculous,” Lisa says.

To lengthen the leg, holes are drilled into the leg bone and screws are inserted to stabilize an adjustable leg brace. Then, surgeons carefully saw the leg bone in half below the knee, and the braces slowly stretch the bones apart. Over time, Dr. Bai says new bone grows into the gap and increases the person’s height.

Lisa says most patients are out of commission for at least six months after the surgery, and others remain in seclusion from friends and family for a full year. At this time, the bulky braces are removed, and the new bone is hard enough to withstand normal activity.

Despite the pain and price—anywhere from $10,000 to $40,000—Lisa says patients think it’s worth the sacrifice. “If this is something that does make people feel better, far be it for us to intrude our opinions,” she says. “But it certainly is very extreme. I had never experienced anything quite like it.”

Printed from Oprah.com on Thursday, March 4, 2010

A Shoe Lift Insole Can Make You Appear Taller

December 14, 2009

A Shoe Lift Insole Can Make You Appear Taller

Height is an attribute that is associated with many things. Power, confidence, trust, and pride all come to mind when I think about tall people. This is a common thought that has been proven through sociological studies. If you were not given height naturally, you can make yourself appear to be taller by using shoe lift insole.

A shoe lift insole is a small piece of rubber, gel, neoprene that is placed into your shoe. It will lift your heel up so that you will appear to be taller. The amount of change is up to you. You can decide to gain a half an inch, or three inches. Whatever you decide, the shoe lift insole will be hidden by your shoe, so your height will appear to be natural.

It used to be that if you wanted to gain height you had to wear elevator shoes. These shoes worked by adding height to the bottom of the show. These elevator, or platform shoes are still in existence, but many people avoid them because they are obvious and bulky. Instead, you can use an insert, and get your height growth inside of your shoe.

When you are shopping for an insert you have to make sure of a couple of things. You need to make sure that it is the appropriate height, and that it gives the appropriate support. A model that extends the full length of the foot will typically give good support.

You can also find inserts that only cover the heel. These models are easily interchanged with any pair of shoes that you own, but they do not offer as much support.

The shoe lift challenge: Eat your heart out, Tom

October 22, 2009

The shoe lift challenge: Eat your heart out, Tom
By VINCE GRAFF

How did Tom Cruise suddenly grow three inches to be taller than his wife? We asked this vertically challenged writer to test one theory … and see if it stacked up.

As breakfast table talk goes, it was something of a bombshell.

“There’s something I’ve never told you,” my wife of three years announced sheepishly as she cleared away the remnants of our 16-month-old son’s Rice Krispies, “because I was worried I might hurt your feelings . . . I nearly dumped you as soon as we met”.

(Gulp. What could I have done to so appall Helen that she’d considered bringing our burgeoning romance to such a swift end?)

“I spent the first 24 hours of our relationship thinking: ‘Do I really want to go out with a man who’s shorter than me?'” she explained.

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What a difference three days make: Tom Cruise looks unusually taller than wife Katie Holmes

“But, sweetheart, I soon realised I shouldn’t be worrying about something so silly.”

Er, thank you, darling.

I am 5ft 2 3/4 inches (don’t you dare snatch that extra three-quarters of an inch away from me); Helen is 5ft 4in.

It’s never seemed to be a problem before, though she did agree to forsake stilettos on our wedding day so that I didn’t end up looking like wee Jimmy Krankie in the photos.

It seems, though, that ours is not the only relationship where height is an issue.

Last week, the Mail carried fascinating photos of Tom Cruise and his wife Katie Holmes at two film screenings.

Tom is said to be 5ft 7in, and Katie 5ft 9in.

But in the first picture, taken at the premiere of his movie Lions For Lambs in Los Angeles, Tom was clearly the taller of the two.

Three days later, at a screening of the film in New York, he was suddenly shorter than his wife.

Before you ask, Katie was wearing similar heels in both pictures, so there’s no way her choice of footwear can explain Cruise’s mysterious height fluctuation.

Yet somehow he’d shed four inches in three days.

So how did that happen?

If Tom’s fast-disappearing inches had come off his waistline rather than his height, he’d have the whole of Hollywood at his feet.

And maybe it’s those feet that explain Tom’s minor miracle.

For what if the famously height- challenged actor had been wearing lifts in his shoes in LA?

Shoe lifts, in case you’ve not come across them before, are little inserts that can be placed inside shoes in order to lift your heel – and, thereby, your height.

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Standing taller: Vince Graff with wife Helen

A more extreme alternative, the socalled “elevator shoe”, in which the lift is an integral part of the footwear, allows you to boost your height by as much as four inches.

Both are impossible to detect from the outside.

A full set of shoe lifts can cost £250, while a single pair of off-the-shelf elevator shoes will set you back between £50 and £100.

But if you’d like a pair of hand-made bespoke elevator shoes – the type that might appeal to a Hollywood star perhaps? – you could spend £1,700 on a pair.

Still, what price pride? I’m the smallest man in my family and was the smallest boy in my primary school until I was eight or nine.

Being a teenager in a class where all the girls towered over me was also not much fun.

Whatever they say about “personality” being the most important thing, I soon discovered the appalling truth: girls don’t make passes at men who are short-arses.

Now I’ve passed my shrink-washed genes onto my son.

George was born quite a large lad (8lb 13oz), but in no time at all he had slipped down the height and weight tables until, like his dad, he was an out-and-out shortie.

He’s now languishing on the second centile – meaning that 98 per cent of babies his age are taller than he is.

I was worried about this for a while.

Then, one night, I found myself at a party where there were 50 or so other men.

I looked around and realised that I was the shortest bloke in the room.

Hardly a scientific survey, but it dawned on me: I must be in the bottom two per cent, too.

Anyway, I’ve had my fill of being small.

I’m fed up with always being the last person at the bar to get served; in a rage at being trampled on during rush-hour train journeys; riled at having to pay the full price for a cinema ticket when I get to see only half the screen.

Yes, short men have it tough – and I want to be taller. Now!

Logging on to the internet, I find what seems to be the answer to my prayers.

Alongside a cheesy picture of a man stroking his chin – not the sort of bloke who struggles to get served at his local – there are 18 styles of elevator shoes, from trainers to formal brogues, that promise to increase your height by up to four inches.

Prices range from £49.99 to £99.99. I opt for brown suede moccasins and a pair of black leather ankle boots.

There’s nothing to be ashamed of in ordering these height-boosting shoes, of course – why would there be? But just in case I’d like to keep quiet about it, the website promises: “All orders are treated in the strictest confidence. All products are sent in plain unmarked packaging.”

When my package arrives, I can’t contain my excitement.

The shoes are well-made and smart.

From the outside, they look like any other pair of shoes, with the soles and heels no deeper than usual.

The secret is inside: the insole is dramatically raised up at the back end of the shoe and tilts down towards the front.

When I slide my feet in, it is as if I am wearing stilettos.

Standing straight and proud, I admire myself in the mirror. I am now a giant among men – a huge 5ft 6in!

One small problem.

Though I’m now three inches taller, my trousers are not three inches longer – and they’re now too short. (The company doesn’t mention on its website that you’ll have to replace every pair of trousers you own.)

I stride proudly into the living room and hug my wife.

She doesn’t notice that the man embracing her is now a giant.

She does, however, realise that something is up.

“Vince,” she says. “You’re looking very slim today.”

It’s not a bad start, I suppose.

I head for London’s West End for a night out. What will happen when I try to order a drink in a bar? And will women treat me any differently?

My first mistake is running for the bus.

Clunk, clunk, clunk. The shoes are heavy and I am not used to running (or walking) with my feet at this peculiar angle.

The bus whizzes off without me.

Eventually, I get to the pub, stride up to the bar and catch the barmaid’s eye.

Within seconds, I’m being served. Is this because of my new-found confidence or my new-found visibility?

The barmaid tells me that, yes, I do look 5ft 6in, and that my shoes look perfectly ordinary to her.

Not that she ever ignores small people at a crowded bar, she tells me. Never. Yeah, right.

Time to move on. Slowly

The stiff virgin leather is pinching my big toe, and my legs are aching under the weight of the shoes.

The barman at my next port of call, the fashionable Soho Hotel, is also in denial.

Paolo, from Ecuador, claims: “It’s all about how polite you are – height has nothing to do with how quickly you get served.

“If you scream and shout at me for a drink, you’ve got no chance – even if you’re 6ft 6in tall.

“But the thing that works 100 per cent of the time is an attractive woman. I just can’t help it. Sorry.”

Despite not fulfilling his criteria, I’ve been served straight away – though, to be fair, there are only two or three other punters waiting.

But it’s nice to be first for the first time in my life.

I get talking to a group of women.

Bridget is a glamorous 35-year-old blonde from the U.S. who used to own a bar in Spain. She’s 5ft 8in.

“You look quite tall enough to me,” she says, looking me up and down. (Even in my new shoes, I’m still shorter than she is.)

“I’ve never had a problem with short men. I know a lot of women look for tall men, but it’s not a prerequisite for me.”

Before we get any friendlier (too friendly?), I move on.

I do seem to have a new confidence.

But Bridget’s friend Ylva, a 32-year- old Swedish woman who works in IT, soon puts me in my place.

“A few extra inches do help a man become more attractive,” she says.

Unfortunately, my shoes don’t quite hit the mark, and for Ylva I’m still too short.

“I want a big bear hug from a man, so I only really fancy men who are bigger than me,” she says.

“Sorry, but that’s the truth.”

I head off for a bite to eat.

In a Chinese restaurant, I find a group of students celebrating a 19th birthday.

Maybe the younger generation can be relied upon to restore my faith in women?

I ask Rachel, 18, how tall she thinks I am.

“Five foot eight?” she hazards. I am in heaven.

Her pal, a pretty Scottish girl called Sarah, jumps up from the table and measures herself against me, back to back.

It’s soon clear I’m not 5ft 8in, but I am taller than Sarah and Rachel.

“It looks funny if you tower over your man,” says Sarah, thinking it’ll cheer me up.

In fact, it reinforces everything I knew before I entered this land of make-believe. Because, in the end, I know I need to return to the real world.

By now, I am hobbling. There is a blister on my left foot and, like an Essex girl at the end of a night’s clubbing, I need to get my shoes off and go to bed.

And the next morning? I get out my ordinary shoes.

It’s not that Helen objected to my height-boosting shoes.

“I was expecting them to look really embarrassing and naff, like a weird orthopaedic thing, but in fact they are rather stylish” she said.

“The only problem is that you just don’t walk properly in them.”

In any case, she wants her old husband back: “I love you the way you are: as my Vince.”

Swoon. Her reaction makes me wonder: did my new confidence come from my shoes or from within?

On reflection, I’m not sure they gave me anything more than might a couple of vodkas and tonic.

On the positive side, it’s impossible to tell you are wearing height boosting shoes.

No one noticed anything odd, and my extra inches did seem to help me get served (and even admired) in pubs and bars.

But there’s no way I can carry on with the charade. My feet won’t take the strain.

It was intriguing to be given a glance into the giants’ world – but this Gulliver knows where his true home is.

Last updated at 07:05 14 November 2007

The cost of high heels may be measured in pain

September 30, 2009

Beauty is pain, as the saying goes. Now there’s evidence to back it up: Wearing high-heeled shoes now may mean suffering foot pain later, according to a new study. Here is what the LA Times has to say:

Study subjects were asked whether they felt pain, aching or stiffness in one or both feet on most days, and if so, what part of their foot hurt (nails, forefoot, hindfoot, heel, arch and ball of the foot). The 3,372 participants were from the Framingham Foot Study, made up of people from the Framingham Study Original Cohort and the Framingham Offspring Cohort who were evaluated from 2002 to 2008. Numbers of men and women were about equal.

High Heels; is the pain worth it?
Their most common footwear worn currently and previously was divided into several categories and among age groups. The shoe categories were: poor (high-risk shoes that lacked support and structure, such as high heels, sandals and slippers), average (mid-risk shoes with hard or rubber soles such as work boots) and good (low-risk shoes offering good support and safety, such as sneakers).

One-fourth of all participants said they had generalized foot pain on most days. The researchers also said that in women they found an increased risk between having pain in the hindfoot and wearing poor shoes in the past, even after adjusting for weight and age. Fewer men reported pain than women (19% versus 29%), but only 1.6% of men said they wore shoes in the poor category.

In the study, the researchers said that wearing good shoes makes sense for protecting the hindfoot from pain. They wrote: “It is also possible that the single association seen at the hindfoot is due to the tightness of the heelcords that might result from sustained use of high heels.” If this is the case, they add, stretching exercises might offset problems caused by poor shoes.

The study appears in the October issue of the journal Arthritis Care & Research.

— Jeannine Stein

Photo credit: Peter Foley / EPA

The strange, the stylish and the just plain silly

September 29, 2009

The strange, the stylish and the just plain silly
From bunny ears to shoe jewelry, these fashion trends will get folks talking

By Bobbie Thomas
TODAYShow.com contributor

The world we live in is full of creativity — and crazy concepts! From unexpected fashion to technologically advanced beauty, I’ve taken note of today’s most interesting trends.

Whether you’re inspired to hop on board Hollywood’s bunny-ear bandwagon or are simply intrigued to learn women aren’t the only ones buying body-shaping clothing, these ideas are bound to pique your interest and leave you with plenty to talk about!

Hollywood’s haute ears
Celebs are hopping around Hollywood in bunny ears! From the lacey Maison Michel headbands that the Olsen twins and performers Lily Allen and Lady Gaga wore to Madonna’s Louis Vuitton rabbit ears, stars are embracing this playful haute hair accessory. And if bunny ears are too avant-garde for your everyday look, perhaps these designer creations may inspire a fashionable Halloween costume — just pin the tail!

Savvy solutions
These innovative products had me saying, “I wish I had thought of that!” On the Cuff’s sponge bracelets ($7.99; onthecuff.net) stop water from running down your arm when you’re washing your face, doing the dishes or cleaning the car, while Shadow Shields will help you to apply eye makeup like a pro ($9.99; beauty.com).
Image: Ashley and Mary-Kate Olsen
Junko Kimura / Getty Images
Mary-Kate Olsen, right, and Ashley Olsen showed off their Maison Michel lace ears — Ashley in Mickey Mouse ears, and Mary-Kate in bunny ears — at the Opening Ceremony Japan flagship store party on Aug. 29 in Tokyo.

Chest-A-Peel’s pillow pads aim to prevent creasing and reduce wrinkles while you sleep ($34.99; chestapeel.com). Ja’Maal Buster’s Placement Tool will help you apply false lashes perfectly that will look as flawless as the ones on his famous fans ($10; JamaalBuster.com). And for a perfectly groomed bikini line, Peeka Bu Mirror makes it easy to see what you’re doing down there ($35; peeka-bu.com).

Nail news
It seems our fingertips are the hottest accessory imaginable these days! Trendsetters such as Rachel Bilson and Alexa Chung have been making beauty buffs everywhere green with envy all summer long when stepping out in Chanel’s Jade nail polish ($25; Chanel counters). The lacquer made its debut during the label’s runway show back in February, and is now finally available in stores. And Chanel’s upcoming charcoal-gray color already has a strong buzz, even though it’s not set to debut until later this fall.

Aside from color trends, OPI is playing with texture. The brand took favorite shades from the past and gave them matte finishes. And the same six shades will be available in suede starting this month as well ($8.50; opi.com). And what’s my personal favorite choice for nails right now? Hello Kitty nail stickers, of course.

Fancy feet
Embellish your simple stilettos or basic boots with Litter’s “shoe jewelry.” This new line of adornment popped up just in time to kick off a fabulous fall season of fun footwear trends. Consider it a great way to temporarily transform your plain pumps into edgy eye candy using chains, studs and spikes ($70-$245; littersf.com).

Smart makeup trend
While the beauty industry is struggling, big brands are coming up with innovative ideas and technologically advanced products to keep consumers interested. Revlon’s Beyond Natural Skin Matching Makeup ($12.99; drugstore.com) and Almay’s Smart Shade Makeup ($13.99; walgreens.com) are taking some of the guesswork out of matching your makeup to your skin tone. Both come in just a few base shades and are designed to blend into your skin and adjust to your natural pigment.

Smashbox’s O-Glow and O-Gloss claim to be “intuitive” products that react with your personal skin chemistry. O-Glow turns your cheeks the color you blush naturally, while O-Gloss transforms into your own custom shade of perfect pink ($22-$26; smashbox.com).

And while it isn’t in stores yet, be on the lookout for Lancome’s Ôscillation Powerfoundation, which launches in October. This mineral foundation vibrates at the press of a button, breaking down the powder into micronized particles that blend seamlessly into the skin ($48; lancome-usa.com).

Style secrets for men
Ladies have depended on padded bras, Spanx and platform shoes to help flatter their figures for years — and now guys are getting in on the action. Hollywood hunks such as Tom Cruise, Shia LeBeouf and “Entourage” stars Jeremy Piven and Kevin Connolly are wearing LiftKits shoe insoles to get an extra two inches of height ($20-$25; myliftkits.com).

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Beyond a boost in height, men are also looking for a little help when it comes to their shape. GearCom provides waist-slimming boxers that help conceal love handles, while Calvin Klein ($15-$22; cku.com) and Go Softwear feature products with extra padding to help round out a flat rear and even fill out a T-shirt ($19-$35; Gosoftwear.com)!

Hollywood hunks step it up

August 18, 2009

In the August 24, 2009 edition, In Touch Weekly writes:

Women have a number of style secrets – from Spanx and padded bras to platform shoes – in their getting-dressed-up arsenal. Now Tinseltown’s leading men are catching on. Tom Cruise, Shia LaBeouf and Entourage’s Jeremy Piven, Rex Lee and Kevin Connolly have discovered a discreet way to add a little lift to their look, thanks to LiftKits shoe insole. With the offer of up to two extra inches of height, this is one of his style secrets I just might steal!
$20-$25, myliftkits.com

InTouch.p65
“They’re the perfect pick-me-up for the pint-size trophy on your arm!”

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