Posts Tagged ‘Height’

Life & Style: How Tom Makes Himself Taller

August 20, 2010

From the pages of the August 30, 2010 edition of Life & Style, Tom Cruise is critic-ed on the night of the Knight and Day premier in London for looking as tall as Cameron Diaz. Reportedly, Jimmy Au’s tailor to Stars 5′ 8″ and under has dressed Tom in the past. The magazine also reports that Cruise uses Lift Kits shoe insoles to help boost his height, which can also be found at Jimmy Au’s. Check out pages 44 and 45 to get the full scoop.

How Tom makes himself taller

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Tom Cruise – Knight and Day – Short and Tall

August 20, 2010

Tom Cruise and Cameron Diaz at the premiere of Knight and Day in London. Cruise looked to be the height of Cameron Diaz. Tom is reported to be about 5′ 7″ tall and Cameron around 5′ 9″ tall plus she was wearing about 4 inch heels.
The two posed for photos together looking about the same height although Diaz is slouching slightly. Tom Cruise’s boots appear to have a heel on them, but his knees are at about the same height as Diaz’s. He may possibly be wearing shoe lifts. We can only speculate.

reported by the Huffington Post

How to Buy Height Increasing Insoles

December 11, 2009

How to Buy Height Increasing Insoles

Shoe lifts are becoming more and more popular. Why should the tall people be the only one to command the presence of a room? With inserts, you can get the confidence and pride that comes from height. If you want to buy height increasing insoles, here are a few things that you should look for.

First, you need to worry about comfort. It doesn’t matter how comfortable your shoes are, if you get uncomfortable inserts your feet will be in pain all day. If you have the chance to try your inserts make sure that you do. If you plan to buy height increasing insoles online, make sure that they have gel inserts. These will give you the best chance of getting comfortable inserts

Next you have to worry about the most important aspect, height. You can buy height increasing insoles that will add a half of an inch, to up to three inches to your height. You need to decide if you are looking for a big gain, or just to add an extra inch. You also have to be aware of the fact that if you buy large inserts, they may not work with low top shoes.

You can however, get adjustable inserts. These will allow you to add three inches when you are wearing boots, and two inches when you are wearing low tops. Adjustable insoles will be able to fit into a wider range of shoes.

You can also get half model insoles. These inserts only support the heel, but they are much more versatile then the full model design. Half models are good if you plan to wear them with many different shoes, on many different occasions. So no matter what the situation is, you can get the height that you deserve.

Some things never change…

May 3, 2009

In reading this article I didn’t realize that it had been published in 1971 until I reached paragraph 5. It seems just as relevant today as it was the day it was published by Time Magazine – Monday, Oct. 04, 1971. Here’s their report on heightism then and I’m sure it hasn’t changed much in the now.

No matter what his race, creed or financial status, the American male under 5 ft. 8 in.—the height of the average American man—is a victim of discrimination. That is the conclusion of a Cleveland sociologist who has begun a personal crusade against a seldom mentioned form of prejudice that, like racism and sexism, is well established in U.S. society: heightism.

So pervasive is the American bias against the short man, Saul Feldman told a recent meeting of the American Sociological Association, that no one notices it—no one, that is, except the short man himself. To Sociologist Feldman of Case Western Reserve University, that point is well illustrated by the language. Instead of the neutral “What is your height?”, the question is always the invidious “How tall are you?” Dishonest cashiers shortchange customers, and people who lack foresight are shortsighted.

In romantic matters, too, the little man is cut down to size. A woman’s idealized lover is never short, dark and handsome, and both sexes seem to feel that the male should be taller than the female. The tall man thus has all of womankind to choose from; the short man must make do with the little woman. In the movies, either the romantic hero is tall or the heroine is photographed standing in a trench. Violins never throbbed for Mickey Rooney; false eyelashes never fluttered at Edward G. Robinson.

Little Napoleons. In most sports, the short man is given short shrift. Business, it seems, is interested in the short man mostly as a customer for elevator shoes. A survey of recent University of Pittsburgh graduates, for example, shows that those 6 ft. 2 in. and over received average starting salaries 12.4% higher than those under 6 ft. In another study, 140 corporate recruiters were asked to make a hypothetical choice between two equally qualified applicants, one 6 ft. 1 in., the other 5 ft. 5 in. Nearly three-quarters hired the tall man; only 1% chose the short one. (About one-quarter had no preference.)

Yet when he succeeds—despite the tall odds against him—the short man is accused of being a “little Napoleon.” This might be one reason, perhaps, that Americans usually favor the tall political candidate: Feldman says that since 1900 the taller of the two major presidential candidates has always been sent to the White House,* even when the margin was Richard Nixon’s one-inch advantage over Hubert Humphrey’s 5 ft. 11 in.

By Feldman’s reckoning, however, Nixon is soon due for a long rest in San Clemente. Except for Humphrey, all the current major Democratic contenders are taller than the President. Edmund Muskie is a Lincolnesque 6 ft. 4 in., Edward Kennedy 6 ft. 2 in., and George McGovern 6 ft. 1 in.

What can the short man do? Rebel, of course, like everyone else. He could refuse to look up to the tall man, for example, and force him to stoop into an ungraceful and uncomfortable position for face-to-face conversations. He could sneer at the dangers tall men face, such as low tree branches and the cramped back seats of cabs and tiny cars. He could even nominate a short man for President. Sociologist Feldman, who measures a full 5 ft. 4 in., is no doubt available.

*Actually, the shorter candidate occasionally wins. In the election of 1924, for example, 5-ft. 10-in. Calvin Coolidge defeated John Davis, who was 5 ft. 11 in.

LiftKits interview at Sundance Film Festival 2009

March 4, 2009

LiftKits interview with Tropikana TV at Sundance Film Festival 2009

Find of the Week

March 2, 2009

As posted on vivaciouslychataigne.com as the fashion find of the week Vivaciously Chataigne writes:

Ever want your man to be taller than you in heels? Well, I uncovered the secret to his new stature with the unique insoles called LiftKits.

This new vivacious find was founded by three Hollywood guys on the mission to grant average men a step up. LiftKits give men the ability to naturally and comfortably increase their height up to 2 inches. It’s been proven that taller men are more successful. Now little men can use lifts for heading out on a Saturday night to pick up the ladies or stand taller at an important job interview.

I discovered this new sensation at the LRGCreative Recreation Gifting Suite at Sundance 2009 and LiftKits proved one of the more popular booths. Becoming quick favorites with actors like Tom Cruise to celebrity DJ’s such as DJ Irie. LiftKits are quickly becoming a celebrity must-have. I hope they sent a pair to infamously cute, but vertically challenged Kevin Connolly.

You may think that these are a cheat for little guys to hit on you, but face it woman have push up bras, SPANX, fake eyelashes and hair. Everyone cheats a bit and height doesn’t matter when you lying down…

LiftKits uses Shopit for Social Selling

February 25, 2009

The people at Shopit like LiftKits and we like Shopit. Check out the write up they did on LiftKits – Shopit Blog. Pretty funny group over there, but without a doubt, vertically challenged.
LiftKits uses Shopit for selling our patented height increasing insoles on Social Networking and community sites like Facebook, MySpace and Shopit itself.

You can find LiftKits Products and Information here:
http://myliftkits.com/ – whole new look and feel
Facebook page
Myspace profile
Shopit Store
Twitter
YouTube Vids and Tutorials
Add us, follow us, become our friend!

Why are tall women considered superior to shorter women?

January 24, 2009

Why are tall women considered superior to shorter women?

Because if you’re tall like Uma Thurman, other women think you’re more intelligent, assertive and independent, and if you’re as short as Kylie Minogue, you’re merely considerate and nurturing

By Roger Dobson

Generations of women have complained about high-heeled shoes and the crushed toes and bunions they suffer for the sake of an extra inch or two. Now ground-breaking research has proved their sacrifice is not in vain.

Both men and women judge a tall female on first sight as more intelligent, assertive, independent and ambitious. For good measure, they are also judged richer and more successful, whatever the reality.

Psychologists at the universities of Liverpool and Central Lancashire have run the first scientific experiments to prove that “heightism” – which has always been associated with competition between men – colours our view of women’s talents too.

They found that when volunteers were shown digitally lengthened and shortened pictures of women, they made a series of instant judgments about their likely personalities, not all of them flattering. According to Dr Simon Chu, who led the research, it is “the first direct evidence that female height influences perception of their character”.

Tall women do not have things all their own way. The researchers also found that the male volunteers judged small women to be more nurturing and likely to be better mothers.

Shorter women also get support from a separate new analysis from University College London, which shows that women with an hour-glass figure – associated more commonly with small and medium-sized rather than tall females – are seen not only as more attractive, but more intelligent, flirtatious, healthy and fertile. They found that women whose waist was 70 per cent of the size of their hips were thought the most attractive, as well as the most intelligent.

In the Liverpool and Lancashire study, psychologists manipulated pictures of women standing against cars so that the same casually dressed woman appeared in different images to be tall or short. The height of the shorter women was just under 5ft 1in and the taller females 5ft 8in. A hundred men and women, aged 18 to 62, were then asked to rate the women for eight characteristics.

Men believed that shorter women were more considerate, nurturing and homely. However, women on the panel believed that there was no difference between tall and short women for these three traits.

Why men see short females as more caring and more homely is not clear. One theory is that taller women mature sexually later, because more energy is being expended on growing at a time when the reproductive system is developing. Other research has shown that shorter women have more reproductive success – which may be why men see them as more nurturing.

“The accumulating evidence converges on the view that short stature is linked with reproduction, while tall stature is linked with strength,” the report says.

At the same time, expending more energy on growing means that taller women are bigger and stronger, both of which are associated with independence and self-reliance.

Certainly, they are well represented on the public stage. Nicole Kidman, at 5ft 11in, has hardly been held back, although she was unable to wear heels while married to the significantly shorter Tom Cruise. Nor has Uma Thurman, at 6ft. Jodie Kidd, another six-footer, says her height has rarely been a handicap. “I’ve always been very content with the way I look. The only time being so tall has been a problem was when I was showjumping – my feet used to hang down and knock down all the fences.”

The aptly named Liz Large, who runs a clothing company for tall women, said: “I’m 6ft 1in, and it does mean you are noticed automatically. At work I was promoted very young – people just assumed I was grown up and a safe pair of hands.”

Dr David Weeks, a consultant clinical neuropsychologist at the Superyoung clinic in Edinburgh said: “In the past in Britain, being tall has been associated with leadership and social class. If you go back to the early 1940s when they were sorting out who was suitable to be an officer, there three factors – height, dash and moustache. The more, you had the better. Being tall can make a good first impression but it can also be far more enduring and long lasting in people’s perceptions.”

Not that being short is always a handicap. Dr Ros Taylor, a clinical psychologist who has researched image, believes that any advantage a tall person has lasts for a maximum of 30 seconds, after which the positive impression has to be backed up by substance.

“It’s not as if when you are tall that in itself gives you power. It is an initial advantage, and it certainly is an advantage, but if you don’t have it there are other compensations” – an argument that Kylie Minogue, 5ft 1in, and Charlotte Church, 5ft 2in, would support wholeheartedly.

Real Celebrity Heights (or not so much)

December 17, 2008

Ever wonder how tall your favorite celebrities are? We’ll be publishing more of these from time to time.

Tom Cruise 5′ 7 ”

Robin Williams 5′ 7 ”

Dustin Hoffman 5 ‘ 6 ”

Al Pacino 5′ 5 1/2 ”

Seth Green 5 ‘ 4 ”

Dudley Moore 5 ‘ 2 1/2 ”

Danny DeVito 5 ‘ 0 ”

———————-

Drew Barrymore 5 ‘ 4 ”

Mena Suvari 5 ‘ 4 ”

Jodie Foster 5 ‘ 3 1/2 ”

Reese Witherspoon 5 ‘ 2 ”

Kristin Chenoweth 4 ‘ 11 ”

The Bald Truth About CEO’s

December 10, 2008

Follicly challenged CEO Steve Ballmer of Microsoft. The vast majority of executives in our unscientific survey said they would rather be bald than short.
By Kai-Uwe Knoth, AP
Follicly challenged CEO Steve Ballmer of Microsoft. The vast majority of executives in our unscientific survey said they would rather be bald than short.

By Del Jones, USA TODAY
CEOs seem to instinctively know that it’s better to be authoritative than indecisive. They know about the vision thing and the passion thing. They even know a few leadership lessons that aren’t taught in business school — such as, it helps to be tall.

But an unscientific survey of USA TODAY’s panel of CEOs and other evidence suggest that baldness might be a blind spot for many.

TELL US: If you had to change your hair or your height to make it to the top of the corporate ladder, which would you choose?

CEOs say being bald doesn’t impede success and, given a choice, it’s better to be bald than short. So widely held is this conventional wisdom among top executives that when asked to choose, most CEOs say they’d take 2 more inches of height over a full head of Robert Redford hair.

Even most bald CEOs, including many who are both tall and bald, would choose to be taller. “Lack of hair can only mean the brain is busy with more important functions,” says Murray Martin, the 5-foot-8 CEO of $5.7 billion Pitney Bowes, who is being generous when he describes his hair as “thinning.”
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“I don’t believe it ever (affected) my career. But as I progressed, it became less and less of an issue until it is now a point of pride and a personal branding advantage,” says Steve Carley, the 6-foot-1 bald CEO of El Pollo Loco. “It encourages approachability.”

As smart as they are, CEOs have been known as a group to get it wrong. It now appears that was the case just months ago when they almost universally said they didn’t see a recession looming. Could they also be collectively clueless about hair vs. height?

It’s not that being short is a career launching pad. Plenty of studies have found that taller men make more money, gain more success and attract more women. In his book Blink, Malcolm Gladwell says 30% of Fortune 500 CEOs are 6-foot-2 and taller — vs. just 4% of all men.

Bald men are a much bigger slice of the general population. The International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery estimates that 50% of Caucasian men older than 45 and 60% older than 60 have clinical balding. Stress can cause hair to fall out, so all things being equal, the percentage of bald leaders might be expected to be a little higher than average. Yet:

•If elected, John McCain would be the first bald U.S. president since Dwight Eisenhower. To be fair, baldness, unlike height, can be a matter of opinion. At 71, some might say McCain is doing OK in the hair department for his age group. But pictures of 42 presidents indicate that less than 25% were bald or balding, when statistically it should be at least half.

•There are 41 male state governors. Those who are bald or balding make up less than 20% and, yes, that includes the aptly named John Baldacci of Maine. The hair-loss club dropped a governor Wednesday when New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer announced he would resign after being linked as a client to a prostitution ring. He will be replaced by Lt. Gov. David Paterson, who is not bald. Only 10% to 20% of the 84 male U.S. senators are bald or balding.

•Among corporate CEOs, women run four of the largest 125 companies on the Fortune 500. USA TODAY examined photos of the men and considered about 25% to be bald or balding. Bald men running the nation’s largest companies include Chevron’s David O’Reilly, Home Depot’s Francis Blake, Morgan Stanley’s John Mack and Goldman Sachs’ Lloyd Blankfein.

•It may be more difficult to be bald and extremely rich. Warren Buffett, the richest man in the world, according to Forbes magazine, has lost hair in the past year but at 77 still retains a respectable amount. The richest American on the Forbes 400 list who is truly bald is No. 15 Steve Ballmer, CEO of Microsoft. The response of “no comment” was as much a male pattern among CEOs as was their hairline, and Microsoft was among the large corporations with bald or balding CEOs that did not respond to USA TODAY’s requests.

The 11 male U.S. billionaires ahead of Ballmer on the Forbes list have their own hair, or at least appear to. Hair transplants and toupees are still relatively uncommon. Sales of male wigs peaked in the 1970s, and New Hair Institute founder Dr. William Rassman says CEOs are probably no more likely to have rugs or plugs than all men of their age group.

Only 1% of 1,138 professionals making $100,000 or more who responded to an unscientific survey by TheLadders job website said they were bald and trying to cover it up; and just one hair transplant is performed on men for every five breast augmentations performed on women, according to the American Board of Plastic Surgery.

But the success rate of transplants has improved, and they cost less than $7,000 on average, $20,000 on the high end, no more than a one-way ride aboard a corporate jet. Rassman says he has performed hair-transplant surgery on more than 30 billionaires. He declined to identify them.

A 6-foot-6 man creates a commanding presence when he enters a meeting — a feat more difficult to achieve for someone inches shorter, says George Jones, the “follicly challenged” 5-foot-9 CEO of bookstore chain Borders Group. He oversees 34,000 employees and $4 billion in annual revenue.

USA TODAY surveyed its panel of CEOs, retired CEOs and leading executives. There was a lower response rate than for surveys on other topics, but 95% of the 74 who responded said, if given a choice, they would rather be bald than short. More telling is that the 31 CEOs who identified themselves as bald or “headed in that direction” in the unscientific survey were unanimous in saying that being vertically challenged is more detrimental to an aspiring executive’s career.

USA TODAY asked TheLadders to follow up with a survey. The job-search site for high-income professionals got 1,138 responses. Half said they still had as much hair as they did when teens, while 15% said they were bald, and 35% said they were headed in that direction. Among all respondents to the unscientific survey, 67% said 2 inches more in height would be better for career success, vs. 33% who said a full head of hair.

Those results mirrored another unscientific survey taken at USA TODAY’s request by Vistage International, an organization of CEOs. Vistage asked its membership: “If appearances count, what aspect is most helpful in advancing a person’s career?” Of the 219 responding, 66% said taller is better; 34% chose hair.

“I think they are in denial,” Rassman says. He says bald men of power have confessed to him that even they discriminate against other bald men.

Baby-face bias

Academia has largely ignored the impact of balding on success, but Yale University psychology professor Leslie Zebrowitz has written extensively about how people with round faces and other traits that resemble babies are perceived to be more immature in the workplace and in the courtroom by juries and judges.

Zebrowitz says she knows of no research that has tried to determine whether bald men are more likely to have baby faces than men with hair. But if bald men do look more babyish, “Then that could account for their under-representation among CEOs,” she says.

Nicholas Rule, who wrote the paper “The Face of Success,” published in February’s issue of Psychological Science, says bald men may be more likely to be victims of the “baby-face bias” described by Zebrowitz. In his study, Rule had Tufts University students look at photos of CEOs and offer their gut reactions about their leadership capabilities. At USA TODAY’s request, Rule examined the data and found that the photos of bald CEOs were considered by the students to be warmer but less powerful than CEOs with hair.

“A great smile is much better” than hair or height, says Howard Behar, the 5-foot-10 and bald former president of Starbucks North America. “I mean, look at Mitt Romney. Lots of hair. Tall and good-looking. Sure didn’t help him. Compare him to the Dalai Lama: short, no hair and not exactly a looker. Just call me the Dalai Behar.”

Some say that worse than bald is trying to cover it up with a “comb-over” that uses remaining hair to cover the exposed scalp. “Like most CEOs, I’m cognizant of my appearance,” says Bob Kodner, CEO of The Crack Team franchiser that fixes leaking basement cracks. Five years ago, Kodner saw his cranium in an elevator mirror and thought someone had “thrown a piece of baloney on my head.” Ever since, he’s been shaving his head once a week. His advice: Don’t “prolong the inevitable.”

Craigslist founder and Chairman Craig Newmark is bald and “almost” 5-foot-7. Company CEO Jim Buckmaster is a foot taller and rich in hair.

“The general Net community does regard me as eye candy, a la George Costanza” from Seinfeld, Newmark says, but he adds that neither bald nor short is a good thing in corporate life. When pressed to make a choice, Newmark says, “I’d prefer to be a few inches taller.”